Utah

 

Geological State Symbols Across America           Geology of the National Parks Through Pictures


Utah State Geological Symbols
Type
Symbol
Year Established
State Rock
Coal
1991
State Mineral
Copper
1994
State Gem
Topaz
1969
State Fossil
Allosaurus
1988

 

State Rock: Coal

 

 

State Mineral: Copper

 


State Gem: Topaz

 


State Fossil: Allosaurus


 

References

https://statesymbolsusa.org/states/united-states/utah


Geology of Utah's National Parks

Through Pictures

(at least the one's I have been to)

 

Arches National Park

Visted in 2011

 

Arches National Park          Arches National Park

                                The main entrance.                                                  View across park of the park that is close to the main drive in.

 

 

Arches National Park          Arches National Park

       Some balancing rocks.                                                                                        More balancing rocks.

 

 

Arches National Park

 Myself, my wife, and daughter in front of some rocks.

 

 

Arches National Park          Arches National Park

       View of me in front of a double arch.                                                              Another of the arches in the park.

 

 

Arches National Park

Directly in the middle of the photograph was one of the premier arches in the park but it was too much of a hike to get there so we took photos from across the little canyon.


Bryce Canyon National Park

Visited in 2009

 

Bryce Canyon

Panoramic view of southern Bryce Canyon

 

The following pictures were taken during a hike my wife and I did that was supposed to be one of the most beautiful in the US. I certainly enjoyed it thoroughly.

 

Before the descent              Entering Bryce Canyon

                  Me before the descent                                                             Looking ahead at what we are about to tackle.

 

 

Entering Bryce              View across the landscape

            As we enter                                                                             Looking across the landscape

 

 

Walking up the Canyons             Hoodoos

My lovely wife walking up one of the canyons                                                  Looking up at a hoodoo            

 

 

Creek in Bryce              View over Bryce

View from near the creek at the bottom of the canyon                                      Looking over what we just hiked               


Dinosaur National Monument

Visited in 2010 and 2014

 

Being only about three hours away from our house we have visted Dinosaur NM a few times. Here is one of the most recent trips.

Dinosaur National Monument

Obligatory entrance sign.

Dinosaur National Monument

"I hope that the Government for the benefit of science and the people, will uncover a large area, leave the bones and skeletons in relief and house them in. It would make one of the most astounding and instructive sights imaginable." - Earl Douglas, 1923


Earl Douglas discovered the quarry in 1909. 

 

Dinosaur National Monument

And here is the main attraction. The fossil wall in panorama form. The Fossil Wall is part of the Carnegie Quarry that was the original quarry from which the park was built around.

 

Dinosaur National Monument

The northern end of the fossil wall. The Fossil Wall is in the Morrison Formation, a rock unit that is the Late Jurassic in age, approximately - 155-148 million years old. 

 

Dinosaur National Monument

And the southern end. Although dinosaur fossils are found in many different rock units, it is the Morrison Formation where most of the dinosaurs discovered in Dinosaur NM have been found.

 

Dinosaur National Monument

View of the outside of the main exhibit building. The building is newly rebuilt (since the other one basically fell off the wall) and rests right on top of the fossil layer. The next picture is a shot in the opposite direction from the building.

 

Dinosaur National Monument

Picture from the fossil wall in the northern direction (away from the building) where you can track the Morrison Formation fossil layer across the parking lot.

 

Dinosaur National Monument

Closer up shot of the fossil layer from the previous picture. You can make out the Fossil Discovery Trail running along the base of the fossil layer towards the lower center of the picture (fossil layer is the dark layer just left of center).

 

Dinosaur National Monument

View of the fossil layer looking back up at the building. Most of the best fossils were all up within the building but most people found it exciting to discover fossils "out in the wild". 

 

Dinosaur National Monument

Departing dino shot. The Stegosaurus represented here is one of the many fossils that have been found within the park along with Camarasaurus, Diplodocus, Apatosaurus, and Allosaurus, among others. 


Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Visited in 2009

 

Glen Canyon NRA

Driving into the main canyon from the south.

 

 

Glen Canyon NRA

Canoeing around the lake we found this little island to let the dogs run around on.

 

 

Glen Canyon NRA              Glen Canyon NRA

Another piece of the island.                                                                      View from our canoe.

 

 

Glen Canyon NRA              Glen Canyon NRA

We stopped to climb among the rocks with the dogs.                                            View from our lunch stop.              

 

 

Glen Canyon NRA             

Views from the canoe.                                                                              Our Campsite.

 

 

Glen Canyon NRA

View of the lake from our campsite.


Golden Spike National Historic Site

Visited in 2008

 

Golden Spike Sign              RR Crossing

             Sign at the Entrance                                                                   RR crossing sign with train in distance

 

 

On the Jupiter              Stop the Trains!

Me on the platforms next to Jupiter                                           Veronica stopping the trains from colliding

 

 

Jupiter              Last rail laid on Transcontinental Railroad

            Veronica and I in front of Jupiter                                      The last rail laid for the Transcontinental Railroad


Timpanogos Cave National Monument

Visited in 2008

 

Carved out Tunnel              Trail edge

Veronica in front of one of the carved out tunnels                                               Me on the trail edge                    

 

 

Trail edge              Salt Valley

              Veronica on the trail edge                                                    Looking out into the Salt Lake valley

 

 

In the caves              Wedged in the passageways

           In the caves looking down                                              Me wedged into one of the passageways

 

 

Don't stop on the redline              Stopping on the redline

Don't stop on the red line, so what does she do.....?                                             She stops to take a picture                     

 

 

Fault              Flowstone

A fault running right past one of the walkway cutouts                                                 Flowstone within the cave             


Zion National Park

Visited in 2009 and 2013

 

Zion National Park

Obligatory entrance sign

 

Zion National Park

View down the Lower Fork Virgin River from the bridge that leads to the Emerald Pools Trail. Most of the visible cliff rocks within the canyon are the Navajo Formation. The Navajo Formation is a rock unit that used to be a vast desert that crossed the middle of North America.

 

Zion National Park

 Nice view up the cliff along the Emerald Pools Trail.

 

Zion National Park

 The tired hiker on the trail.

 

Zion National Park

Under one of the many waterfalls along the trail.

 

Zion National Park

The Navajo Formation is actually prehistoric dunes. As the wind blows in a desert, the sand gets blown into piles called dunes. Eventually the sand gets blown over the top of the dunes. As more and more sand gets blown over the top, eventually the dune actually moves. The layers seen above, called cross-beds, are produced by this movement of the sand over the top and down the side of the dune. The side the sand slides down is called the slipface.

 

Zion National Park

 View out of the Emerald Pools Trail into the main valley. When sandstone gets lithified (turned into rock) it produces a really hard rock that is difficult to erode. So when a river does erode a sandstone, the rocks not directly next to the river can form steep cliff faces, as seen within the Zion Canyon.

 

Zion National Park

Another view into the main valley.

 

Zion National Park

View of the Three Kings.

 

Zion National Park

Towards the eastern edge of the park is some of the best cross-bedding in the park.

 

Zion National Park

Some more cross bedding.

 

Zion National Park

Here are some pictures from the first visit to the park. This one is a view up the trail at the northern edge of the Canyon.

 

Zion National Park

Some more cross bedding within the Navajo Formation.

 

Zion National Park

You can see the erosion of the crossbedding produces a striking visual appearance.

 

Zion National Park

Some more cross bedding.